Carrie / Nonfiction / Reading Lists

Write That Novel

Have you ever thought about writing a novel? November is National Novel Writing Month.

According to their site, “National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is a fun, seat-of-your-pants approach to creative writing. On November 1, participants begin working towards the goal of writing a 50,000-word novel by 11:59 PM on November 30. Valuing enthusiasm, determination, and a deadline, NaNoWriMo is for anyone who has ever thought about writing a novel.”

Here are five books to get you started on that novel you’ve always wanted to write. Also, check out the NaNoWriMo site for more encouragement.

schmidt

Book in a Month by Victoria Lynn Schmidt

If you make time to write and put away all of your excuses, could you stay on track and finish your novel in only a month? With a structured plan and a focused goal, yes, you can

Using a combination of flexible weekly schedules, focused instruction, and detailed worksheets, author Victoria Schmidt leads you through a proven 30-day novel-writing system without the intimidation factor.

So what are you waiting for? If you’ve been putting off your book project, let Book in a Month be your guide and find out just how much you can accomplish. (GoodReads description)

 

baty

No Plot? No Problem! by Chris Baty

You’ve always wanted to write, but . . . just haven’t gotten around to it. No Plot? No Problem! is the kick in the pants you’ve been waiting for.

Let Chris Baty, founder of the rockin’ literary marathon National Novel Writing Month (a.k.a. NaNoWriMo), guide you through four exciting weeks of hard-core noveling. Baty’s pep talks and essential survival strategies cover the initial momentum and energy of Week One, the critical “plot flashes” of Week Two, the “Can I quit now?” impulses of Week Three, and the champagne and roar of the crowd during Week Four. Whether you’re a first-time novelist who just can’t seem to get pen to paper or a results-oriented writer seeking a creative on-ramp into the world of publishing, this is the adventure for you. (GoodReads description)

king

On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King

Part memoir, part master class by one of the bestselling authors of all time, this superb volume is a revealing and practical view of the writer’s craft, comprising the basic tools of the trade every writer must have. King’s advice is grounded in his vivid memories from childhood through his emergence as a writer, from his struggling early career to his widely reported near-fatal accident in 1999—and how the inextricable link between writing and living spurred his recovery. Brilliantly structured, friendly and inspiring, On Writing will empower and entertain everyone who reads it—fans, writers, and anyone who loves a great story well told. (GoodReads description)

 

bernays

What If?: Writing Exercises for Fiction Writers by Anne Bernays & Pamela Painter

An essential to any writer’s library, What If? is comprised entirely of specific exercises intended to help the reader master the art of writing fiction.The exercises isolate the various elements of fiction – dialogue, plot, characterization, point- of-view, etc. – and present specific problems to solve through writing.Directed toward both beginners and professional writers, this book addresses topics such as discovering where to start and end a story; learning when to use dialogue and when to use indirect discourse; transforming real events into fiction; and finding language that both sings and communicates precisely. For those interested in writing fiction. (GoodReads description)

 

clark

Writing Tools: 50 Essential Strategies for Every Writer by Roy Peter Clark

One of America’s most influential writing teachers offers a toolbox from which writers of all kinds can draw practical inspiration.

“Writing is a craft you can learn,” says Roy Peter Clark. “You need tools, not rules.” His book distills decades of experience into 50 tools that will help any writer become more fluent and effective.

WRITING TOOLS covers everything from the most basic (“Tool 5: Watch those adverbs”) to the more complex (“Tool 34: Turn your notebook into a camera”) and provides more than 200 examples from literature and journalism to illustrate the concepts. For students, aspiring novelists, and writers of memos, e-mails, PowerPoint presentations, and love letters, here are 50 indispensable, memorable, and usable tools. (GoodReads description)

 

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